London Theatre Highlights - November 2020

Will Rathbone

Theatres across the capital have been working tirelessly to either adapt shows to make them socially-distant, re-work their auditoriums and venue operations to make them COVID-safe or to produce new work that is ready-made to operate safely within the current restrictions. All of which the only question left to ask yourself is… what to see?
 
One of the biggest success stories of the past few years, Six: The Musical is the first big West End show to re-open since lockdown. Showing at the Lyric Theatre from 14 November till 31 January 2021, the musical reclaims the stories of the six women who married King Henry VIII and re-focuses history through their eyes. Not only that, it’s also a short, sharp burst of rock and power-pop, with an award-winning, internationally renowned soundtrack.
 
The Royal Court has responded to the current crisis in typically inventive manner. Living Newspaper is a series of six weekly takeovers of the Royal Court space, led by a writer, from freelance creatives across the theatre spectrum. Running 11am-11pm Thursday through Saturday, from 12 November - 19 December, each week sees a response to the biggest stories of the week, with rooms throughout the building dedicated to satire, long-form think pieces, a sports section, dating columns - basically every section that would comprise a regular newspaper, brought to life - with a guest theatre company also presenting a response to the world each week in whatever form they choose. It promises to be thought-provoking, challenging and disruptive in equal measure.


 We’re fast approaching Halloween, and immersive theatre specialists CoLab Theatre have put together Flicker, a socially distanced and COVID-secure theatrical experience for pods of two people to attend - if they’re brave enough! From 21 October - 8 November, the Colab Tavern in Borough invites you to join the Reverend Parks as he battles to exorcise a ghost haunting South London. Audiences solve puzzles, join a seance and venture into a haunted basement in this thrilling encounter. 
 
One of the last plays to show at the National Theatre saw Rafe Spall star as Michael, a man struggling with both his late father’s and England’s history of institutional racism, in a monologue penned by one our finest living playwrights, Roy Williams, alongside footballer-turned-writer/director Clint Dyer. Death of England: Delroy, which runs from 21 October - 28 November, is a sequel from the same duo which focuses on Delroy, Michael’s best friend, a man similarly struggling to come to terms with the ugly side of his country. Given the tumultuous summer of protests both here and across the pond, this couldn't be more timely.


 
The Big House is a charity which works with care leavers at risk of social exclusion and provides a platform, through theatre-making, by which they can learn valuable life skills, gain confidence and make their voices heard. They create immersive promenade performances at Big House, in De Beauvoir, and their latest offering is The Ballad of Corona V, running from 28 October - 21 November. If their previous work is anything to go by, this promises to be a confident, powerful and fully engaging reflection of the world told by genuinely unheard voices. No prizes for guessing the theme of this production!

Your inbox deserves a little culture! Get our monthly newsletter