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Your Guide to the Turner Prize 2019

30 September 2019 | Maisy Farren

The world-renowned Turner prize leaves the Tate Britain every other year, each time establishing itself in a gallery outside of London. This year sees the annual exhibition of nominee’s work displayed at Margate’s Turner Contemporary, bringing the name sake of both award and gallery together in a celebration of visual arts. 

Inspired by JMW Turner’s innovative and controversial approach to art, the Turner Prize aims to showcase the most outstanding exhibitions displayed by artists born, living or working in Britain. The prestigious prize is awarded for an exhibition displayed in the previous year, and the winner will be announced on 3 December 2019. You can see the exhibitions presented by the four shortlisted artists at the Turner Contemporary from 28 September 2019 – 12 January 2020. The exhibition is free, and an excellent chance to see work by one of the rising stars in the art industry. The Turner Contemporary will present work by the following shortlisted artists: 


Image credit: Sfeir-Semler Gallery⎢Beirut & Hamburg via Facebook 
Lawrence Abu Hamdan 
 
The Turner Prize’s first exhibit comes from Lawrence Abu Hamdan, an artist and audio investigator from Amman, Jordan. He’s studied at Middlesex University and has a PHD from Goldsmiths, University of London. His work primarily explores ‘the politics of listening’ and the role of sound and voice within human rights issues. He works in collaboration with Amnesty International and Defence for Children International to obtain investigation testimonies. His nominated work is Earwitness Theatre, first presented at Chisenhale Gallery (London), and the video installation of Walled Unwalled, first presented at the Tate Modern (London). Abu Hamdan worked with former detainees of the Syrian regime prison Saydnaya, helping them to recall their audio memories using sound effects. His exhibition portrays the complete sensory deprivation and entire darkness the prisoners were kept in, helping the survivors to map the architecture of the prison and make sense of their time spent there. 
 

Image credit: Void Derry via Facebook 
Helen Cammock 
 
Helen Cammock is Staffordshire born, and has studied at the University of Brighton and the Royal College of Art, London. She’s presented exhibitions across the UK and Ireland and won the Max Mara Arts Prize in 2018. Her work spans across film, photography, print, text and physical performance, studying marginalised voices deep in the complexities of social history. Nominated for the Turner Prize 2019 is her solo show The Long Note, first exhibited at Void Gallery (Derry). This work explores the role of women in the civil rights movement in Derry Londonderry in 1968, a year considered to be pivotal to the Irish Troubles which lasted through to the Good Friday Agreement of 1998. Women’s voices are at the core of this show, combining archive materials, new footage and interviews done by Cammock. 
 

Image credit: Kettle's Yard via Facebook 
Oscar Murillo 
 
Columbian born Oscar Murillo emigrated to London at the age of 11, studying at the Royal College of Art, London and the University of Westminster, London, before going on to exhibit work all over the world. His practice incorporates drawing, sculpture, video, live events, painting, bookmaking and collaborative projects with different communities. His work looks at materials, process and labour, alongside issues of migration, community, exchange and trade across the globalised world. His work draws on his own experiences and the experiences of his family and friends, as well as referencing life and culture in his hometown of La Paila. Murillo has been nominated for his show Violent Amnesia shown at Kettle’s Yard (Cambridge), his joint show at Chi K11 Art Museum (Shanghai) and his involvement in the 10th Berlin Biennale (Berlin). 
 

Image credit: The Tetley via Facebook 
Tai Shani
 
Tai Shani is an artist living in London, who’s had an unconventional artistic education. Born to Israeli parents in a family of bohemian artists, Shani has lived in various locations all over the world. Her education wasn’t as formal as the other shortlisted nominees, failing to be accepted on MA courses at top universities across London. Her multidisciplinary work is made up of performance and illustration relating to narrative texts. She’s become well known through her ongoing project Dark Continent, a theatrical set of instillations based on a feminist text from 1405, The Book of the City of Ladies. She creates fantastical female characters, combining them with her own narration and music from the popular indie girl group Let’s Eat Grandma. Her nomination is based on her participation in Glasgow International 2018 (Glasgow), her solo exhibition DC: Semiramis at The Tetley (Leeds) and her participation in Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance at Nottingham Contemporary (Nottingham). 
 
Visit the Turner Contemporary, Rendezvous, Margate, Kent, CT9 1HG between 28 September 2019 and 12 January 2020 to see the Turner Prize 2019.

Entry to the gallery and the exhibition is free. 
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